Ms Word Toolbar Descriptive Essay

The ToolbarA toolbar is a bar containing buttons and options that you use to carry out commands. With toolbars, commands become just handy and easily accessible to users. The buttons contained in them are used to access commands more quickly than by opening the menus and the respective dialog boxes.

ScreenTips
I mentioned earlier that toolbars contain smart icons serving as shortcuts to the main menu commands. However, these toolbars offer too many buttons of various looks and shapes for a user to easily remember their names or their functions. You might well ask: 'What is the use of a toolbar button if its name or function is not known?' Well, the ever-creative programmers at Microsoft also once contemplated this problem. So they fashioned a tool known as ScreenTip. ScreenTips, also known as Tooltips, are little pop-up descriptions that appear when you rest the mouse pointer over a toolbar button. They appear on the screen to provide certain information about a toolbar button, tracked change, or comment or to display a footnote or endnote.

So, any time you are at a loss as to the name or use of a toolbar button, simply rest the mouse pointer over such button and immediately, you'll see a little text pop-up below the pointer, saying something. This is a ScreenTip or ToolTip.

In case the ScreenTips don't appear when you move the pointer over a button, it is possible the feature has been disabled/turned off. You can turn it on by doing the following:
  1. On the Tools menu, click Options and then click the View tab.
  2. Under Show, select the ScreenTips check box.
That's all. Those are the steps you'll also take to deactivate the feature, for one reason or another, though not advisable.

HOW TO DISPLAY/INVOKE A (MISSING) TOOLBAR
Suppose a toolbar you need very much to hasten your work (e.g., the Formatting Toolbar) is not currently visible on screen, what would you do to invoke such 'missing' or 'hiding' toolbar from its hiding place? Well, anytime you face a situation like this, simply use any of the following methods to bail yourself out.


Displaying A Toolbar Using the View Menu
  1. On the Menu bar, click View. This displays the View menu.
  2. Then, on the View menu, point to Toolbars item.
  3. This now displays the Toolbars sub-menu, in which the names of certain toolbars are shown. Here, you'll find that some of the toolbar names have a check mark to the left of them, while some have none. The check mark indicates the toolbar bearing it is already displayed on screen.
  4. Select and click the name of the desired toolbar from the Toolbars sub-menu.The toolbar you selected will then appear on screen.
Fig: Showing or hiding a toolbar using the View menu

Those are the steps you'll also follow to hide a toolbar you no longer want on screen at a particular moment.

NOTE:

If you can't find the particular toolbar you are really looking for on the Toolbars sub-menu, click Customize, and then click the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog box that appears. In the Toolbars list, click the checkbox next to the name of the toolbar you want and then click Close. See figure below.
Fig: Showing or hiding a toolbar using the Customize dialog box

To Display a Desired Toolbar Using a Shortcut
Simply right-click an empty space on any toolbar, and then click the name of toolbar you want.

TIP:  If you do not see the toolbar you're looking for on the  shortcut menu, click the Toolbar Options arrow, point to Add or Remove Buttons, click Customize, click the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog box, and then, in the toolbars list, click the checkbox next to the toolbar you want and click Close when you are through.
Fig: Displaying the Customize dialog box via the Toolbar Options button


At this juncture, I'm quite confident to a reasonable extent that how to determine the name of any toolbar button/icon should never be a problem to you, since the ScreenTips are there to "tell-tale". Right now, your problem, I guess, should be: "What exactly is the function of each of these toolbar buttons/icons?" Well, if you have asked that question, it simply shows you are bright and ready to learn. The good news is, you are not helpless: I have dedicated the following sections to expatiate a little on the Standard toolbar, Formatting toolbar, and the Drawing toolbar, since you will be using them constantly.


Standard Toolbar

You have learned that the Standard toolbar is, by default, docked directly below the Menu bar, and that it contains buttons used for performing tasks similar to the commands available in the Menu bar. Let's now take a moment to identify the name and purpose/use of each of the buttons on the Standard toolbar.




Formatting Toolbar

The Formatting toolbar offers shortcut buttons to help format a document quickly. From the Formatting toolbar, you can quickly apply formatting attributes such as Font; Font Color; Alignment; Line Spacing; Bullets and Numbering, etc, document text, to save time.

The following table provides a list of Formatting toolbar buttons and a brief description of each.


NAME


ICON


USE

Style
Opens a Style drop-down list from which you can
select one.
Font
Changes the font of the selected text or number.
Click the drop-down arrow beside the box and select a font from the list.
Font Size
Changes the size of the selected text or number.
Enter a size value in the box, or select an appropriate size from the
drop-down list.
Bold
Applies or removes bold formatting to or from a
selected text or number.
Italic
Makes selected text or number italic, but
removes italic from selected text or number if it's already italic.
Underline
Underlines (rules a line)  or removes
underline formatting from selected text or number.
Align Left
Aligns the selected text, number or inline
object to the left with a jagged edge.
Center
Aligns selected text, numbers or inline objects
to the center.
Align Right
Aligns the selected text, number or inline
objects to the right, with a jagged edge.
Justify
Aligns the selected paragraphs to both the left
and right margins or indents.
Numbering
Adds numbers to or removes numbers numbers from
selected paragraphs.
Bullets
Adds bullets to or removes bullets from the
selected paragraphs.
Decrease Indent
Indents the selected paragraph to the previous
tab stop or indents the content of the selected item to the left by one
character width of the standard font.
Increase Indent
Indents the selected paragraph to the next tab
stop or indents the content of the selected item to the right by one
character width of the standard font.
Outside Border
Adds or removes a border around the selected
text, paragraphs, cells, pictures or other objects.
Highlight
Marks text so that it is highlighted and stands
out from the surrounding text.
Font Color
Formats the selected text with the color you
click


Drawing Toolbar

The Drawing toolbar is located at the bottom of the window, between the Horizontal Scroll bar and the Status bar. Like every other toolbar, this also contains smart icons representing shortcuts to Main menu commands in Word.

It holds buttons/tools used in creating drwaings, such as rectangles, ovals, lines, arrows, WordArt text, etc. It also offers tools for inserting organizational charts and ready-made pictures and Clip Arts from their different locations.

Also included in this toolbar are tools for formatting inserted objects and for adding special effects such as shadow or 3-D to lines, rectangles, ovals, etc. Like every other toolbar also, the Drawing toolbar can be displayed or hidden.

The following table shows a list of tools offered on the Drawing toolbar, and their functions:


NAME


ICON


USE

Draw
Offers a number of options for defining the
relative positions, arrangements, rotation, etc, of drawings in a document.
It also offers tools for changing the shape of AutoShapes.
Select Objects
Changes the pointer to a selection arrow so you
can click to select objects in the active window.
AutoShapes
Offers a group of ready-made shapes that include
basic shapes, such as rectangles and circles, including a variety of lines
and connectors, block arrows, flowchart symbols, stars and banners, and
callouts.
Line
Allows you to draw a straight line where you
click or drag in the active window.
Arrow
Draws or inserts a line with an arrow head where
you click or drag in the active window.
Rectangle
Draws a rectangle where you click and drag on
the active window. You can also draw a square using this tool by holding
SHIFT while you drag.
Oval
Draws an oval where you click and drag in the
active document. To draw a (perfect) circle, hold down SHIFT while you drag.
Text Box
Draws a text box with horizontal direction where
you click and drag in the active document.
Insert WordArt
Creates decorative text by inserting a Microsoft
Office drawing objects.
Insert Diagram
Creates an organizational chart or a circle,
radial, pyramid, or Venn or target diagram in your document.
Clip Art
Opens the Clip Gallery where you can select the
clip art image you want to insert in your document or update your clip art
collection.
Insert Picture
Inserts an existing picture in your  active
document at the insertion point.
Fill Color
Adds, modifies, or removes the fill color or
effects from the selected object.
Line Color
Adds, modifies, or removes the line color from
the selected object.
Font Color
Allows you to add, modify, or remove the text
color of the selected text.
Line Style
Used to select a thickness for the selected
line.
Dash Style
Allows you to control the appearance of the
selected line.
Arrow Style
Allows you to select the style of arrowhead.
Shadow Style
Allows you to select the shadow appearance of
the selected drawing object.
3-D Style
Allows you to add depth to drawing objects such
as lines, AutoShapes, and freeform objects.















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Introduction

The Drawing Toolbar

The Drawing Toolbar consists in a Microsoft Word template document (files with extension « .dot ») displaying a special command bar to the user. With the various buttons offered, the user can then create simple mathematical figures and choose a proper layout on the page.

The Drawing Toolbar exports many commands that already exist in Microsoft Word but are most of the time not easily accessible to the average user. Other functions have also been implemented for mathematical purposes, such as creating a grid, triangles or graduated lines.

I don't have access to an English version of Microsoft Word. Hence every word in this document may not be accurate, but the meaning should help you find the right feature. Don't hesitate to help me translate this document by telling me the right words used in Microsoft Word. Thanks in advance.

Getting started

Installation

In order to be able to use the Drawing Toolbar, you need to proceed to the following:

  1. You must allow the execution of macros. In menu Tools, then Macros, then Security, go to the second tab and make sure to check the box Trust Visual Basic Project (or something similar)
  2. You first need to install it to a special location so that it will be automatically loaded by Microsoft Word on its startup. Usually, this location is . To be sure, just open the template document, it should tell you where to copy it.
  3. Verify that the template is a global template. To do so, in the « Tools » menu, click on « Templates and add-ons » (or something similar, I don't have Word in English), then verify that the checkbox for the template is effectively checked.
  4. You must then restart Microsoft Word. If everything went right, you should have a new button called Drawing in the standard command bar.

In case you decide to customize some features, such as changing the language, Microsoft Word will popup a window saying that the project is signed and hence the project signature will get invalidated. Just ignore this message (this message comes from the fact that the Mathematics Toolbar saves the user preference in its file directly and hence breaks the signature used when I created the document).

Built-in Microsoft Word functions

Grouping and Ungrouping

Regrouping graphical objects enables to handle them as a single entity, so that this entity can be easily positioned on the document. I remarked that only few people use the grouping functions when drawing figures, causing terrible loss of productivity when things have to get moved inside the document or between documents.

I recommend grouping the objects of a figure into a single entity once the figure is complete, this enables easy positioning on the document and a great gain in productivity.

ButtonDescription of the button
Groups selected objects into a single entity.
Ungroups the entity (needed in case you want to modify the entity).

Simple objects

When drawing an object (such as a rectangle, a triangle, etc.) while leaving the Shift key down, this forces the object to have the same height and width (hence the rectangle becomes a square). This is really useful!

ButtonDescription of the button
Draws a line "hand-free". When wanting to emulate a hand-free drawing, first draw it using lines, rectangles, etc, then redraw on your existing figure with this tool.

Click here to popup an example of this functionality (you need to have Javascript active).

Drawing with the hand-free tool

The Hand-Free Tool is the most powerful drawing tool of Microsoft Word. It enables drawing lines, broken lines, really hand-free parts, closed and opened curves and many other things. The first step consists in the drawing of the control points of the curve.

In order to draw a straight line, you just need to click, then release the mouse. In order to draws a curve, you just need to click, then maintain the mouse button down.

In order to finish the curve, you just need to click twice at the same place (this will create an opened curve), or to click twice where you started drawing the curse (this will create a closed curve).

Example of closed curve

In this example we will create a curve in four steps:

Creates an opened or closed curve with linear, curved or hand-free borders.
Creates a rectangular triangle.
Creates an arc of an ellipse (or of a circle if the "Shift" key is down). Useful for noting angles between segments.
Creates an ellipse (or a circle if the "Shift" key is down).

Rotational or symetrical transformations

It is not possible to rotate an object containing text areas, you hence must first rotate the figure before adding text areas.

Positioning in the document

These tools enable to choose the position of the figure on the document.

By default, the figure is placed over the text. Because of that, many users add newlines in the document in order for the figure to not be over the text, but this is not a nice solution. One should better use the figure positioning capabilities of Microsoft Word.

Other useful stuff

ButtonDescription of the button
Duplicates (clones) the currently selected object. This can also be done by pressing the "Shift" key while dragging the object.
Shows a panel enabling enforcement of objects positioning on an invisible Microsoft Word grid. Sometimes, it is quite useful to deactivate the grid when you want to draw an object at a very specific place on the document (for example when drawing an arc).
Anchors or removes the anchor of the currently selected object. Every object has an anchor that helps Microsoft Word to determine where the object lies compared to the current paragraph. When an object becomes anchored to some piece of text, the object will move with the text, but also it is still possible to move the object on the document, however, the object will remain anchored to the text.

New functions

Adding text letters to a figure

ButtonDescription of the button
Inserts a borderless text area of 1 square cm with a letter in it.
Inserts a letter surrounded by a 1 cm diameter circle (useful to number figures).
Inserts a dot of 1 mm diameter.

Grid and graduates lines

These tools enable the creation of grids and graduated lines with many user-specified parameters.

ButtonDescription of the button
Inserts a grid.

Click here to popup an example of this functionality (you need to have Javascript active).

This tool is programmed in VBA, hence the creation of the figure takes some time, so be patient.

The Grid panel

By pressing the Grid button, a preference panel pops up enabling to modify the following parameters:

  • X Size and Y Size are expressed in squares and enable choosing the number of horizontal and vertical squares to draw
  • X Step and Y Step represent the size of the squares in centimeters (for example you can choose a square of 0.5 cm on 1 cm (hence it becomes a rectangle)
  • Dash represent the thickness of the lines
  • Half-graduation enables to draw intermediate lines with dashed lines

The following example illustrates this functionality:

Inserts a XY Axis.

Click here to popup an example of this functionality (you need to have Javascript active).

This tool is programmed in VBA, hence the creation of the figure takes some time, so be patient.

The XY Axis panel

By pressing the XY Axis button, a preference panel pops up enabling to modify the following parameters:

  • Xmin and Xmax are expressed in units. Xmin must be negative and Xmax positive.
  • Ymin and Ymax are expressed in units. Ymin must be negative and Ymax positive
  • X Step and Y Step represent the size of the units in centimeters (for example, the X unit can be of 0.5 cm and the Y unit can be 1 cm
  • X Factor and Y Factor are the multiplicative factors of the legend, respectively for the X and Y axis(for example, if the X factor is 1 and the Y factor is 2, then each graduation for X will be of 1 increment and of 2 increments for the Y axis)
  • Dash represents the thickness of the lines
  • Half-graduation enables to draw intermediate lines with dashed lines

The following example illustrates this functionality:

Inserts a graduated horizontal line (X Axis).

Click here to popup an example of this functionality (you need to have Javascript active).

This tool is programmed in VBA, hence the creation of the figure takes some time, so be patient.

The Graduated Line panel

By pressing the Graduated Line button, a preference panel pops up enabling to modify the following parameters:

  • Xmin and Xmax are expressed in units. Xmin must be negative and Xmax positive.
  • X Step represents the size of the unit in centimeters (for example the unit can be of 0.5 cm)
  • X Factor is the multiplicative factor of the legend (for example, if the factor is 2.5, the legend for each unit will have a step of 2.5)
  • Dash represents the thickness of the lines
  • Half-graduation enables to draw intermediate lines with dashed lines

The following example illustrates this functionality:

Geometrical 2D and 3D figures

ButtonDescription of the button
Inserts a triangle in real size.
Inserts an arc of an ellipse (or of a circle) defined by its radiuses and its angle.

Click here to popup an example of this functionality (you need to have Javascript active).

This tool is programmed in VBA, hence the creation of the figure takes some time, so be patient.

The Arc of Ellipse panel

By pressing the Arc of Ellipse button, a preference panel pops up enabling to modify the following parameters:

  • Small Radius is expressed in centimeters ans represents the vertical radius of the ellipse hosting the arc
  • Great Radius is expressed in centimeters ans represents the horizontal radius of the ellipse hosting the arc
  • Angle represents the arc in degrees (for example if the angle is 90°, we get a quarter of an ellipse)
  • Dash represents the thickness of the line

The following example illustrates this functionality: the result is an arc of circle of 150° with a radius of 3 cm:

3D ObjectsInserts predefined 3D objects.

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